Currently viewing the category: "Nuclear Power"

 

Mexico’s awaited Energy Reform is part of a larger scheme of structural changes that the government is implementing to boost the country’s economic and social development in the coming years. The development of a strong political and legal framework to ensure the growth of renewable energy use is [...]

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In the midst of approval of significant structural reforms, President Enrique Peña Nieto is currently touring Europe, selling the renewal of Mexico’s economic fortunes to presidents and businessmen alike. The country’s recent opening to private investment in new sectors is hugely significant as many European power utilities have their eyes [...]

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Mexico has a long and well-established tradition of water resource management. The system of grants and allocations of surface and groundwater is governed by the National Water Law (LAN), and CONAGUA (the National Water Commission) is the national authority on the subject. However, efforts to manage the country’s water resources have been insufficient as mechanisms [...]

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Since Peña Nieto was declared the new president of Mexico, the country’s energy industries have been eager to know which direction the new administration was going to take in defining its national energy strategy. However, in the last few days, the country is starting receive a bit of information while Peña Nieto tours European capitals, [...]

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When analyzing the production levels of each form of energy, certain patterns begin to form due to distinct factors. Contrary to energy sources such as hydrocarbons that are very strongly influenced by the economy for output, some renewables are more significantly affected by the actual availability of resources at the time.

What exactly does [...]

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Nuclear power is generally considered to be a cost-competitive alternative to traditional power generation techniques, combining high levels of generation with zero greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, there is a relative abundance of uranium in comparison to fossil fuels, with only a small amount required to produce energy. Because the cost of uranium is small when [...]

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This past weekend, the Mexican beaches of the Gulf of California—also known as the Sea of Cortés—welcomed political leaders from all over the world for the 2012 G20 summit. The most pressing issue discussed at the meetings was the European crisis and the approach that member countries of the E.U. [...]

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The promise of a green and sustainable future paints the perfect picture; however, in reality, transitioning a world dependent on fossil fuels to renewable energies is not as easy as it sounds. One of the most important factors that is slowing this transition is the cost of renewable energies in comparison to traditional sources of [...]

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Only two years have passed since Mexico hosted the United Nation’s 2010 edition of the Climate Change Conference, COP 16, in Cancun, where most of the delegates left the conference in a breezy mood, feeling like the world had at least taken a modest step forward. However, recent events make it seem like [...]

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A little over a year ago, on March 11th 2011, a 9.0 earthquake (measured on the Richter magnitude scale) struck near the coast of Tohoku, Japan. The quake triggered a 10 to 15 meter-high tsunami wave that rode at a speed of 800 km per hour all the way to the northeastern coast of Japan, [...]

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