Currently viewing the category: "Nuclear Power"

Mexico

On May 22 CFE’s director announced that the company had MX$350 million allocated to face the 30 hurricanes expected in both the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean. And rightly so since heavy rain conditions caused spotted blackouts on Sunday evening in the north of Tamaulipas. As of 12:30 of Monday CFE […]

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As the Energy Reform continues evolving, qualified users face an avalanche of options to satisfy their energy consumption requirements, each having its own risks and benefits, which companies now have to evaluate and compare to choose the option that best fits their interests, panelists said on Wednesday at the Mexico Energy Forum 2017 in […]

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Mexico initiated its nuclear program at the late 1950s when the country opened the National Nuclear Energy Commission, which led to the construction of Mexico’s only nuclear power plant, Laguna Verde, in 1976. Since then, the advancement of the national nuclear sector has moved relatively slowly, with the construction of Laguna Verde’s second reactor in 1995, […]

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Nuclear energy is as feared as misunderstood. It is based on nuclear fission, a nuclear reaction process in which the nucleus of an atom splits. In consequence, free neutrons and protons are produced, releasing a large amount of energy. The main principle of nuclear energy is that nuclear reactors convert the energy released from nuclear […]

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The deployment of renewable energies has far reaching consequences that go beyond the mitigation of climate change and economic competitiveness. Renewables are altering and lowering market prices for electricity on a global basis, and much of the new capacity has fallen out of the hands of large utilities. The large expanse of market […]

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When analyzing the production levels of each form of energy, certain patterns begin to form due to distinct factors. Contrary to energy sources such as hydrocarbons that are very strongly influenced by the economy for output, some renewables are more significantly affected by the actual availability of resources at the time.

What exactly does […]

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This past weekend, the Mexican beaches of the Gulf of California—also known as the Sea of Cortés—welcomed political leaders from all over the world for the 2012 G20 summit. The most pressing issue discussed at the meetings was the European crisis and the approach that member countries of the E.U. […]

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The promise of a green and sustainable future paints the perfect picture; however, in reality, transitioning a world dependent on fossil fuels to renewable energies is not as easy as it sounds. One of the most important factors that is slowing this transition is the cost of renewable energies in comparison to traditional sources of […]

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Only two years have passed since Mexico hosted the United Nation’s 2010 edition of the Climate Change Conference, COP 16, in Cancun, where most of the delegates left the conference in a breezy mood, feeling like the world had at least taken a modest step forward. However, recent events make it seem like […]

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A little over a year ago, on March 11th 2011, a 9.0 earthquake (measured on the Richter magnitude scale) struck near the coast of Tohoku, Japan. The quake triggered a 10 to 15 meter-high tsunami wave that rode at a speed of 800 km per hour all the way to the northeastern coast of Japan, […]

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